Services

Home Inspection

Sewer Scope Inspection

Sewer Scope Inspection

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We identify threats to health and safety, non code complying conditions, areas of deferred maintenance and functional obsolescence. We perform a visual and hands-on inspection of the major mechanical and structural components of the home, from rooftop to foundation. The inspection includes:

  • The property site, building exterior, a complete roof inspection*, the attic, chimney, fireplace, and building interior.
  • The plumbing, electrical, and heating systems.
  • The foundation and structural members by entering the crawl space.
  • The built-in appliances are tested for proper operation, and we include several energy conversation and safety items.
  • Disclosure of additional construction to the building, and verification that the construction is code complying.
  • Answers to the “Seismic Disclosure” questions the seller is required to provide to the buyer (applicable if the home was built prior to 1960).

*multiple story roof inspections provided for an additional cost, single story roofs are included with our standard report 

Sewer Scope Inspection

Sewer Scope Inspection

Sewer Scope Inspection

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As a property buyer, you are probably aware of the standard steps in the process, such as a home inspection. A home inspection—as performed to state and InterNACHI guidelines—is looking for the functionality and safety of systems and components like the structure, electrical, floors, drains, and windows, etc. Nevertheless, regular home inspections don’t cover an inspection of the whole sewer line.


If you are planning to buy a home, it is always recommended to cover all the bases to prevent expensive repairs down the road; therefore it’s a smart choice to get a sewer scope inspection. By performing a sewer scoping, you’ll be able to inspect the drain lines, identifying all possible issues, such as tree roots that have penetrated the pipes, settlement cracking or pipe “bellies” where liquids and solids can pool.

Radon Testing

Sewer Scope Inspection

Radon Testing

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  Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that forms naturally in soil.  Radon is produced when uranium in the soil breaks own.  Radon is known to cause lunch cancer and it can seep into our homes and workplaces through cracks and openings in floors and crawlspaces.  When this happens, radon becomes part of the air we breathe.  


The U.S. Surgeon General's Office recommends testing your home for radon every two years, and retest any time you move, make structural changes to your home, or occupy a previously unused level of a house.  If you have radon level of 4 pCi/L or more, take steps to remedy the problem as soon as possible.


Colorado Premier Property Inspections can help you determine if the radon levels in your home require mitigation.